Category Archives: Uncategorized

Presentation from AGPR Poverty Reduction Roundtable

On April 28, 2015, the Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction organized an event to gather feedback from stakeholders which could be used to guide the development of the upcoming provincial poverty reduction strategy. Liz Weaver from Tamarack: An Institute for Community Engagement facilitated the workshop which included provincial context and small group discussions about ‘moving from priorities to impact.’

The PowerPoint slides (in PDF) from the workshop can be found here: AGPR Poverty Roundtable Presentation April 2015.

Smart Social Programs

In an opinion piece in the New York Times, Jason Furman argues that “investing in families” (e.g. financial and nutrition assistance programs for low-income families) have a very positive impact on, not only these families, but society as a whole. Contrary to what some skeptics believe, these programs can have long-term positive effects and do not appear to increase dependency. Recent evidence suggests that these benefits are not captured in short-term outcomes. In the long-term, these types of programs have been found to be cost-effective (e.g. reducing crime and health care expenditures).

Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/11/opinion/smart-social-programs.html?_r=0

Poverty linked to future high health-care costs: CBC

This article from the CBC showcases stories from people living in poverty and medical professionals who work with vulnerable populations. An article in the latest issue of the American Journal of Preventative Medicine added to the body of evidence of a link between poverty and health care utilization. The researchers found that reducing poverty would assist with health care sustainability and improve health among the most vulnerable.

Link to the CBC article: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/poverty-linked-to-future-high-health-care-costs-1.3065822

Link to the journal article (Open Access): http://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797%2815%2900082-3/fulltext

Public Online Consultation – Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction

The Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction has launched an online survey which aims to gain feedback from the public about root causes of poverty, priorities for action, and potential solutions. Saskatchewan residents are asked to fill out the survey to share their experiences and thoughts on how the provincial Poverty Reduction Strategy should be developed. The survey closes May 15, 2015.

Link to the survey: http://gos.fluidsurveys.com/surveys/eccs/poverty-reduction-survey/

A recent article was published on the CKRM website about the Advisory Group and their consultations: http://www.620ckrm.com/ckrm-on-air/ckrm-local-news/9248-saskatchewan-government-creates-advisory-group-on-povery

We need to talk about poverty and health

“As we approach the October election, Canadians ought to remember that poverty, health and the economy are inextricably linked issues. We ignore those links at our peril.” Read more in this commentary provided by Carolyn Shimmin in the Toronto Star.

Link: http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2015/04/15/we-need-to-talk-about-poverty-and-health.html?referrer=true

New safety nets needed for era of chronic inequality: Toronto Star Op-Ed

There has been much discussion about the need to reform our social support systems. In a response to recent proposals made by prominent intellectuals, this article by Carol Goar makes the important point: what Canada needs are safety nets redesigned with — not just for — the people who need them.

From the Toronto Star: http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2015/04/14/new-safety-nets-needed-for-era-of-chronic-inequality-goar.html

Canada Without Poverty’s Economic & Social Rights Online Course

What do economic and social rights have to do with Canadians? What have the United Nations and courts said about poverty as a violation of human rights in Canada? Why are economic and social rights important for women? Why should we look at housing, access to food and education under a human rights framework?

Canada Without Poverty is offering a four week online course for people all across Canada to learn and discuss the answers to these questions. Experts in the field will participate in the discussions.

The course will run April 13th-May 10th. The cost is 123.39 (but a a fee waiver is available for persons living in poverty).

For more information on this continuing education opportunity, please visit the CWP website: http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2014/03/sign-up-now-for-cwps-economic-and-social-rights-course/

High income inequality tied to poor health

By Margot Sanger-Katz, New York Times

This article, reprinted in the Globe and Mail, discusses new evidence from the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The study found that inequality at the county level has a considerable impact on health; people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same. The article noted that it is well known that living in a poor community makes you less likely to live a long life, but there is new evidence which suggests that living in a community with high income inequality also seems to be bad for your health.

Link: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/high-income-inequality-tied-to-poor-health/article23743705/

PFS Presentation to Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction

On March 31, 2015, representatives from Poverty Free Saskatchewan met with members of the Advisory Group on Poverty Reduction. PFS delivered a presentation to the group. This presentation provided background information on the structure and work of Poverty Free Saskatchewan (e.g. research, building connections and consultations). The presenters also discussed some ideas the AGPR should consider in moving forward e.g. the potential to create legislation as part of a comprehensive strategy to reduce poverty, and the need to involve people with lived experience with poverty in the process in meaningful ways.

PFS presentation to AGPR – Mar 31 2015 – final

Budget 2015: Families will be hit

By Emma Graney, Leader-Post, March 19, 2015

The article features opinions by Peter Gilmer from the Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry and Poverty Free Saskatchewan. The provincial budget was released yesterday, which revealed cuts to many programs due to reduced oil revenues. Eligibility changes were announced for the Saskatchewan Employment Supplement, Active Families Benefit and Seniors’ Drug Plan (meaning that fewer residents will qualify for these programs) and funding for child care subsidies, Transitional Employment Allowance, and rental housing supplements is being reduced. Concerns have been raised that these changes are going to make it more difficult for residents living in poverty. The provincial government announced that it would be working towards an antipoverty strategy late last year, but this budget “doesn’t move us in that direction at all” according to Gilmer.

Link: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/business/Budget+2015+Families+will/10901984/story.html